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Pediatrics - Menstruation 

Introduction
Menstruation is a normal and healthy part of a female’s life.  Menstruation, commonly called a period, occurs each month in a fairly regular cycle.  During this time the uterine lining sheds.  A period usually lasts from five to seven days.  Common symptoms include bloating, cramps, headaches, and mood swings.  Symptoms can differ from person to person and from month to month.

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Anatomy
The internal female reproductive system includes the ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, and vagina.  The ovaries are two small organs that produce eggs (ova) and hormones.  An ovary typically releases one mature egg each month.  Two fallopian tubes extend from near the ovaries to the uterus.  The fallopian tubes transport the mature eggs to the uterus (womb).
 
The uterus is a pear-shaped organ where a baby grows in during pregnancy.  The lining of the uterus undergoes cyclic changes to facilitate and maintain pregnancy.  The uterus is joined to the vagina by the cervix.  The vagina is a muscular passageway that extends from the cervix to the external female genitalia.

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Causes
The menstrual cycle is a regular process that is regulated by hormones.  The average menstrual cycle lasts around 28 days, but it varies among individuals and may be longer or shorter.  Each month the uterine lining thickens as it builds up extra blood and tissue in preparation for a potential fertilized egg.  An egg that is fertilized by a sperm cell may implant itself in the nourishing uterine lining and develop into a baby.  An unfertilized egg or a fertilized egg that does not implant in the uterus passes through the reproductive system.  During menstruation the uterine lining sheds and the blood leaves the body through the vagina.

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Symptoms
Menstrual cycles, periods, and symptoms vary from month to month and from person to person.  Periods usually last from five to seven days.  Common symptoms include bloating, headaches, lower abdominal cramps, and breast tenderness.  Your child’s moods may change, and she may feel more irritable or sensitive than usual.  Your child may crave certain foods.  She may feel tired and have difficulty concentrating

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Diagnosis
Menstruation is a normal and healthy part of a female’s life.  You should contact your doctor if your child experiences longer, shorter, heavier, or skipped periods.  Contact your doctor if your child has severe pain or bleeding in between periods.  These can be symptoms of other medical conditions and should be evaluated.

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Treatment
There are several ways your child may be able to ease her symptoms.  It can be helpful to exercise, use relaxation techniques, and get plenty of sleep.  Eating a high fiber diet and avoiding food and drinks that contain alcohol, caffeine, sugar, or salt is helpful.  Taking a warm bath or applying a heating pad to the lower abdomen may help make cramps feel better.  Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication may help relieve symptoms.

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Am I at Risk

Is My Child at Risk?

Menstruation is a natural and normal part of the female menstrual cycle.  Girls typically get their first periods at about age 12 or 13, but it may occur a few years earlier or later than that.  Menstruation normally occurs each month until a woman reaches menopause, which usually takes place in her late 40s or early 50s.  Menstruation subsides during pregnancy. 

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Complications
Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a mixture of symptoms that can begin about two weeks before a period starts.  PMS symptoms include those of menstruation, but they are more severe.  You should tell your doctor if your child experiences PMS because there are many treatments that can be helpful.
 
Endometriosis is an abnormal overgrowth of the endometrial tissue in the uterus.  Symptoms of endometriosis include pain, heavy periods, and bleeding between periods.  Endometriosis may be treated with hormone medications and surgery.  Untreated endometriosis can become severe and result in infertility.  Contact your doctor if your child experiences abnormal pain, usually heavy periods, or excessive bleeding between periods.

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This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.

The iHealthSpot patient education library was written collaboratively by the iHealthSpot editorial team which includes Senior Medical Authors Dr. Mary Car-Blanchard, OTD/OTR/L and Valerie K. Clark, and the following editorial advisors: Steve Meadows, MD, Ernie F. Soto, DDS, Ronald J. Glatzer, MD, Jonathan Rosenberg, MD, Christopher M. Nolte, MD, David Applebaum, MD, Jonathan M. Tarrash, MD, and Paula Soto, RN/BSN. This content complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information. The library commenced development on September 1, 2005 with the latest update/addition on April 13th, 2016. For information on iHealthSpot’s other services including medical website design, visit www.iHealthSpot.com.